The disappearance of a non-existent girl (StoryADay Post)

Unknown Person
Unknown Person (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As her friends chatted about various things, Tanya Shinnok stepped out of the clubhouse. Earlier, she had been warned to be careful whenever she stepped out of the clubhouse, as there were people out there who were looking to kidnap her. She know that there are many people living in the city of Harrison Creek, Oregon that did not like her for various ( and rather pathetic) reasons.

Such as the person who have been watching her and her friends for a few weeks now.

The person was dressed in bright yellow clothes with a long black overcoat covering his body. The person was also wearing a pair of dark glasses and a fedora. As soon as he saw Tanya, he approached her, saying, “Are you Tanya Shinnok?”

“Yeah,” Tanya said without so much as skipping a beat. “What’s it to you?”

“I’ve noticed that you’ve been causing plenty of undue trouble for this city,” said the person, “and I think it’s time for you to go.”

“Where am I going?” Tanya quickly began to panic. “Who are you? Why are you doing this? Who sent you here? Have you been stalking me and my friends? What is going on here?”

Instead of answering her questions, the person pulled out a rope from his coat pocket and tied her up. As soon as she was bound and gagged, he took her to a black car and drove away from the clubhouse.

“Let me out! Let me out of here!” Tanya screamed as she pounded on the bottom of the trunk door. “Let me out of here this instant!” But the kidnapper ignored her protests. “You can’t do this to me!” Tanya continued to yell. “I know people, big-named people. When they find out that you talk me, they will hunt you down and tear you apart!”

Yet the kidnapper ignored her as the car continued to drive further and further away from the clubhouse, and farther away from her friends. If anything, Tanya knew Stuart, Irene, Mara, and Pearl would know she was missing. They would call the police.

To her shock, nothing of that sort happened. In fact, no one knew that she was missing at all. Not until a few days had passed.

But what did happen was the black car stopping at what appeared to be a storage place. Before she knew what was happening, Tanya found herself being pulled out of the trunk. Still bound and gagged, she was carried into the storage building. Another person who was dressed in a dark coat and a fedora notice the first person said, “Were you able to get her?”

“I must admit I had a bit of a struggle restraining her, but not to worry, she’s here and now,” set the first person. “And if we play our cards right, no one will ever know that she existed.”

“Good,” said the second person, “but now we must move onto phase 2 of the plan. We have already planted the seeds of hate in this town, especially where are girls concerned. Won’t take long for the police to round up those people on a list and have them taken to jail. The sooner that happens, the sooner we can deal with those Teen Rebels.”

“I agree,” said the first person. “I’m getting real tired of chasing those kids around. Don’t they have anything better to do than to hang out with each other?”

“That is our next project,” said the second person. “Now take that little brat and put her into our cubby hole; we have bigger fish to fry.”

As the two evil people left the place, Tanya untied herself and scrambled around the tiny storage area; she didn’t have any time to waste. She had overheard a plot against her friends and the city they lived in, and she needed to get that information out before it was too late…

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3 thoughts on “The disappearance of a non-existent girl (StoryADay Post)

  1. This was really fun to read. It felt a little rushed, but it was good to get right into the action. I liked how you had some annotations here and there, but I couldn’t figure out why those specific elements. What I love most about this is the dialogue. It feels fresh and it feels genuine. It’s different. There is humor in all the dialogue, but it’s subtle and doesn’t overwhelm. Do you think you’ll keep writing about Tanya?

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